Published On: Tue, Jan 21st, 2014

Industry Insider ~Scott Kelby

A Star is Born

Posted on December 11th, 2017

That’s Stephen Wallace, and you probably recognize him as the KelbyOne member who was the winner of our contest for a solo show in the Gallery at KelbyOne, but he’s also a rising star, and on Saturday night his star was certainly shining bright!

Right after his interview with Larry Becker, broadcast live and viewed all over the world, I was standing in the theater when a gentleman who was in the audience came up to tell Steve how much he admired his work, and how fascinating his talk was, but he said something that really stood out. He said to Steve that what was most amazing to him was for an incredible of a photographer as Stephen is, he was so humble about it all. It made us all love him, and his work, even more.

It was a magical night
Like the openings for Mark Wegner and Melanie Kern-Favila before him — there is something so special that happens when we all come together to experience beautiful art; to share the process and learn about the person behind it; and to celebrate what is good in this world. It was a wonderful night of learning, laughter, and watching as another star is born. I’ll share some of the images from the evening here, with a few captions, but if you get a chance, watch Stephen’s talk from the gallery (it’s embedded a little farther down this page). There is so much to this artist, to his man, and he has a lot to share. He truly honored the gallery with this images, and his words.

Above: I took this shot at the end of the night, after everybody left, down low with a wide angle lens. Stephen’s images from Myanmar (formerly Burma) looked amazing on the walls.

Above: He talked a lot about why he choses to photograph so often in Southeast Asia. His answers were so insightful.

Above: His use of natural light, and his understanding of how to harness that light, was really intriguing. So simple, but so effective.

Above: I grabbed a few shots before and after the sold out crowd arrived for his opening.

Above: That’s my personal favorite of Steven’s gallery images. It’s like he’s flying.

 

Above: Some scenes from Steve’s opening. 

Above: Matt Kloskowski and his wife Diana dropped by – that’s Matt chatting with Steve before his talk.

Above: I know we talk a lot about Bay Photo Lab’s Xposure printing system, but you should see the reaction of people who visit the gallery. The images look so amazing, and the mounting is so clever. It was one of the first things Stephen looked at when he saw his images for the first time. We feel very fortunate, very blessed to have BayPhoto as our sponsor for the gallery — their printing system helps the images come alive.

Above: This is Steve’s interview from Saturday night with Larry Becker (who was as awesome as always) – it says “The Grid Live” for some reason, but that’s not what the actual video is — it’s Steve’s chat with Larry. I promise you – you’ll love it. You’ll learn a lot. You’ll laugh, too. You’ll be intrigued and engaged, and you’ll just really enjoy it. You’ll see some wonderful images, and meet a fascinating man who has lived a pretty incredible life. I hope you take the time. It’s worth it.

Above: Steve and his wonderful wife Becky. We got to spend a little time with them before and after the gallery opening, and they are just awesome people.

Are you next?
On Thursday, we’ll be announcing the next gallery competition opening dates and how you can submit your images, during a live Webcast we’re doing for KelbyOne members on how to get your work noticed in 2018. It’s just one part of our presentation, but it’s an important one.

I hope you’ll be joining some of these amazingly talented people — photographers who all thought they’d never be the one chosen. If you think you probably won’t win…you’re in good company.

A special thanks
I want to give a special thanks to our in-house team who works so hard to put together this special evening. Thanks to Merideth Duffin, our director, Steve Nicolai who leads our video team and makes sure everything works like a charm; to Juan Alfonso our camera operator and jack-of-all-trades; to Rachel Scott who wore many hats from event photographer to social media maven (her day job) to live chat moderator; to Jean A. Kendra for all her help, for being our cheese and wine expert, and for being so supportive of this idea from the very beginning. Thanks to Larry Becker (he’s just so brilliant); to Pam Suttmiller for always helping every time, and to Erik Kuna, who so loves what we’re doing and why we’re doing it, and helps in every aspect from start to finish.

It all started with Kalebra’s dream
None of this would even be possible if Kalebra hadn’t come up with the idea to take someone from our community and find a way to raise them up; to give them a bigger audience for their work; to get them the recognition they deserve. Thank you for being so awesome, and for having such a heart for others. You are just such a cool person.

My thanks for Steven and Becky for honoring our studio, and being such fun, modest, and just just awesome people. Thanks, Steve for sharing your gift with our members and with the world. It was a night none of us will soon forget.

Here’s to a great week everybody, and to new opportunities. :)

Best,

-Scott

The post A Star is Born appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

Removing Nasty Color Fringe in Photoshop (or Lightroom for that matter)

Posted on December 8th, 2017

Got a quick and easy Photoshop tutorial, that also works in Lightroom, and it’s how to get rid of those nasty purple, magenta, or green color fringe that appears around the edges of object in your image (this problem is a common lens issue called Chromatic Aberration). Here’s how to fix it quick and easy.

Hope you found that helpful. :)

Tomorrow Night You’re Invited to an “Artist’s Talk” with one incredible photographer: Stephen Wallace
He’s the latest winner to have his own solo show at “The Gallery at KelbyOne” (here’s more info on the gallery). Well, after Stephen’s wine and cheese reception tomorrow night, we’ll be going into our theater for an intimate chat about Stephen’s work, his life as a physician/attorney, and his techniques, and you’re invited. His travel photography is pretty amazing — really that next-level stuff, and you will love getting a chance to see his hear, and hear his story.

Who: Photographer Stephen Wallace and host Larry Becker
What: A chat with the photographer about his images
Where: Here’s the link to watch it live online (it’s free and open to everyone)
When: Tomorrow, Saturday December 9th, 2017 at 8:00 PM ET
Why: To take someone from our KelbyOne community and share their wonderful work with a worldwide audience

NOTE: If you’re a KelbyOne member and would like to join us in person for the free wine/cheese reception tomorrow night at 7PM at our headquarters just outside Tampa, Florida, click here to grab one of the last remaining spots, and then I’ll see you tomorrow night. 

Have a great weekend everybody. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. My Lightroom seminar is in Ft. Lauderdale on Monday, and then in Charlotte on Wednesday. Hope you can come out and spend the day with me learning Lightroom. 

The post Removing Nasty Color Fringe in Photoshop (or Lightroom for that matter) appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

It’s New Class Thursday!

Posted on December 7th, 2017

Learn Photoshop In One Hour
Join Scott Kelby as he teaches you the essential things you need to learn about Photoshop to get up and running. Photoshop has a lot of depth, but you don’t need to know everything, just the tools people use every day. Starting with a lesson on how to view your photos, Scott moves on to the most commonly used tools such as cropping, Levels adjustments, using Camera Raw as a filter, making selections, removing distractions, understanding layers, and much more. There’s even a bonus lesson on extracting hair from a background. At the end of the hour you’ll be ready to dig deeper into any of the topics you’ve learned, and take it as far as you want to go.

In Case You Missed It
Photoshop is an invaluable tool for all Lightroom users, and in this class Scott Kelby teaches you the most important Photoshop techniques you’ll need to know to get the most out of it. Starting off with the basics of moving between Lightroom and Photoshop, Scott moves on to covering the fundamentals of working with selections and layers, and then builds up from there using various projects to demonstrate how it all comes together. Through the class you’ll learn how to remove distractions, how to blend layers with layer masks, how to work with high contrast images, the fundamentals of portrait retouching, how to get started with compositing, and how to deal with all kinds of problems you might encounter in your photographs. By the end of the class you’ll realize that Photoshop is not that hard when you focus on just the techniques you can’t do inside of Lightroom.

The post It’s New Class Thursday! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Eric Van Nynatten!

Posted on December 6th, 2017

A Bit About Me:
My name is Eric Van Nynatten and I am a photographer based in New York City.

I grew up in Brazil and frequently moved around across the country, which allowed me and my siblings to experience life in a way few others get the chance to.

We were accustomed to being transplanted every couple of months to a new city, a new neighborhood, being introduced to new people and new food. Looking back, I think that the constant change in scenery and environment I was exposed to while growing up contributed to my ongoing desire to explore and photograph new people and places.

The Gear I Use:
Nowadays I shoot primarily with Sony mirrorless cameras, which I chose for their lightweight design and full-frame sensors, my primary one being the A7rii with a 55mm Zeiss 1.8 lens.

I also shoot a lot using my iPhone. I find that if the camera is cumbersome, you will leave it at home more often and miss incredible photo opportunities, so the lighter the better.

A Bit About My Process:
One of my favorite pastimes as a kid was drawing and painting together with my siblings. I could spend hours trying to capture the mood of a scene that I had had imprinted in my mind from a new beach I had been to or a movie I had recently seen, trying very hard to perfect the colors and lighting on a single piece.

Even after picking up a camera, I continued to apply the same effort when photographing, always making sure I was capturing the best light and colors the scene had to offer, be it a cityscape or portrait.

In my photography I always like to approach the scene as if I were shooting a live-action film, always trying to capture a cinematic quality to it, from the composition of the scene to the actions of the people.

When shooting cityscapes or street scenes I’ll often wait quite a while for a shot to line up. Of course, most everything doesn’t align the way I want it, so patience and timing is essential, including being able to walk away from a scene to move on to another when it isn’t working.

I like to imagine the millions of beautiful scenes that go un-photographed every second all over the world. It gets me out and about to try to capture at least a couple of them.

I enjoy shooting the most during uncomfortable hours. It could be just before dawn, during a thunderstorm or blizzard.

To me, the experience of observing those moments in person, capturing a bit of the beauty and excitement on camera, and making sure the finished image transmits a small percentage of that magic to the viewer on the other side is probably the best part about what I do. In fact, It’s probably the sole reason why I do it.

You can see more of Eric’s work at EricVanNynatten.com, and follow him on Instagram and Behance.

The post It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Eric Van Nynatten! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

A little bit noisy

Posted on December 5th, 2017

Hello one and all, and thanks for dropping by again for #HybridDaveTuesdays on #TravelTuesday here at Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider. I’m Dave Williams and I’m here once a week to share something with you from the world of Photography and Retouching, and this week it’s a little note on noise in your images and using the Reduce Noise Filter. Let’s get going!

So, last week I told you all that I was in Tromsø, Norway, and despite the -12 celsius conditions and occasional blizzard I persevered and got some awesome nights of Aurora and had some stunning views before me through the fjords and snow blanketed terrain. One image in particular though, the view from my hotel, was the inspiration for this post. Here it is:-

 

The view from the Magic Mountain Lodge in Lyngseidet, Norway

This was a snapshot caught right at the start of the day before a long drive north. The light was very low, the ISO was very high, and the grain in the image is testament to that. For me the most noticeable noise is up in the snow around the mountain to the right. So sometimes it’s good to leave the noise there, it’s quite a good characteristic to have, but often in the world of commercial photography it’s just not acceptable.

The Reduce Noise Filter

Filter > Noise > Reduce Noise

This tool has been hanging around in Photoshop for a while. It’s generally pretty good but it’s worth noting the name. It’s called the Reduce Noise Filter, not the Remove Noise Filter. The reason I point this out is because it’s pretty hard to remove the noise in an image without losing detail. This is because Photoshop is taking a look at an area of the image and trying to determine which pixels don’t fit, then replacing them with an average of the surrounding pixels. Make sense? So if I have a 9×9 grid with a white pixel in the centre and black pixels surrounding the edges, the noise filter will notice that the white pixel is the one which is out of place and stick a black pixel there. What this does on a larger scale is pretty catastrophic if you think about it. We invested in an awesome camera which we use to shoot RAW, capturing the precise colour and tone of each individual pixel, then we stick it through a noise reduction process which changes each one of those pixels based on it’s neighbour and spews out an average which it’s decided works better. That’s what you need to have in the back of your mind when you use noise reduction, along with this:-

“Nobody ever threw away a photo of their relative, their wedding, their partner, or their cat because it was noisy.”

-Hybrid Dave, 2017

So let’s break it down. One type of noise that the Reduce Noise Filter can deal with is Color (I think that means Colour) noise. This type of noise is red, blue and green dots scattered across your image, often in the form of splodges rather than individual pixels, but it could be either.

When using this filter it’s best to reset the sliders to zero each time to start off, thereby effectively hitting the reset button on the filter and seeing the preview with no filter applied.

Back to the Color Noise, with the slider at zero give it gentle progress to the right until the color noise starts to blend with the rest of the image. Be careful not to slide too far!

 

 

Luminance Noise is next up on the list here. Unlike Color Noise, Luminance Noise is made up of dots which are grayscale, anywhere between white and black. Here’s a closer view from the bottom right of the image showing these dots:-

 

Removing the Luminance Noise comes as a two part process, with the Preserve Details slider activating once you move the Strength slider. What happens here is you effectively smooth out the image using the Strength slider, then bring the detail back with the Preserve Details slider. With the Strength slider set to zero, slowly move it to the right until you’re happy with the effect it’s had on the Luminance Noise. Once you’re happy here, start increasing the Preserve Details slider to bring back the detail without reintroducing the noise. This is simple to understand, and easy to use once you do understand, but without that prior knowledge of what’s actually going on it can be just a random set of sliders being moved up and down. Let’s move on…

 

 

Switching the radial selection from Basic to Advanced will open up the option to apply the noise filter to single channels of colour. It’s the exact same principle as the Color filter, but applied to Red, Green, or Blue only. If you’ve noticed that only one channel needs the filter more than the others it’s a handy tool to have, and it comes with the Strength and Preserve Details sliders right there.

The last thing to look at here is the box entitled Remove JPEG Artefact. This tackles the problem caused by compression in JPEG files. Each time a JPEG is saved the quality gets worse, and it wasn’t great in the first place! This check box will do what it can to reduce the noise caused by the processes a JPEG file is put through in order to try to preserve it from the compression effects.

So that’s my breakdown for you all today on the Reduce Noise Filter right there in Adobe Photoshop. It’a a fairly simple tool, but understanding it will help you to better utilise it, and I hope I’ve helped.

As always, I’d love to see what you’ve made, and I’m on Instagram and Twitter if you want to reach out. Keep an eye on my Instagram story today and tomorrow, I’m currently in the air heading across the pond to New York City to have a little look at how they do Christmas over there!

Much love

Dave

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